Student Learning and Satisfaction

                          Programming for Economics and Analytics course.

Image: Assistant Professor Kathryn Vasilaky and a student look intently at a computer screen during her ECON 395: Programming for Economics and Analytics course.


 

In higher education, student success is commonly defined as persistence in a bachelor’s degree program, leading to a timely graduation. Cal Poly recognizes that a larger understanding of student success includes student learning; student engagement in educationally purposeful activities; student development as a whole person; and, ultimately, student satisfaction with the sum total of his/her college experiences.

Although student learning is itself a complex phenomenon, taking place in multiple courses and curricula over a period of years, the metrics provided below evidence the value of a Cal Poly education.

           97th. Percentile by which Cal Poly seniors outperformed schools in a nationwide assessment of writing and critical thinking skills. Click to review more results from the 2017 Collegiate Learning Assessment           

           85%. Percentage of first-year and senior-level students who rate their Cal Poly education as excellent or good. Click to review more Cal Poly responses in the 2017 National Survey of Student Engagement.           

                      

           5. Number of core competencies evaluated in the university-wide assessment plan. Click to learn more about assessment at Cal Poly.           

                      

                      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


References:

CLA+ (2017). Spring 2017 CLA+ Results — Institutional Report: California Polytechnic State University [PDF file]. New York, NY: Council for Aid to Education.

 

National Survey of Student Engagement (2017). A Pocket Guide to Choosing a College: NSSE 2017 Answers from Students: California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo [PDF file]. Bloomington, IN: The Center for Postsecondary Research at Indiana University Bloomington School of Education.

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